Reiss Nelson is the young player around whom expectations appear to be highest for the new season. @EdwardStratmann takes a close look at the exciting young forward, and what he has to offer this Arsenal team.

Having caught the eye for Arsenal during preseason with some dynamic displays, it was fantastic to see Unai Emery reward Reiss Nelson with a start for the Gunners’ Premier League opener against Newcastle United.

Putting in a shift littered with upside, the 19-year-old vindicated his manager’s selection. Indeed, for the man who joined the club at the age of nine, this was another important step in his quest to become a first team regular at Arsenal.

He returns to the Emirates for the 2019-20 campaign following a beneficial, yet challenging, loan spell with Hoffenheim working under the tactically astute Julian Nagelsmann. In Germany he scored seven goals and obtained 28 appearances in the Bundesliga and the Champions League, this served as a vital experience.

Proving crucial for his development and maturity, as he had to battle injuries and fight for his minutes, his time in Germany reinforced his resolve to stamp his mark during pre-season. And that’s precisely what he did, with Nelson shining against the likes of Lyon, Angers and Barcelona.

Although he’s realistic that his first team minutes will be limited due to the heavy competition for places, he’s determined to grasp every chance that comes his way. “We have Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, [Nicolas] Pepe and Alexandre Lacazette,” he said.

“They are great stars and I’m still only young so I need to sit back and when I get my chance take it,” he explained after the Newcastle win. I just want to take things as they come. It felt great [to start]. It was a great gesture from the boss and I’m just happy to be playing back in Arsenal colours.

“I went away to Germany and I think I did well. But the main goal for me has always been playing in an Arsenal shirt. I know it’s not guaranteed I’m going to be starting week in, week out with the teammates we have. I need to be prepared all the time for whenever I get the call-up.”

A player who can play on either flank or even down the middle if need be, whether starting or coming off the bench, Nelson gives Arsenal another dimension going forward courtesy of technical qualities, speed and intelligent movement.

To start with the latter, he shrewdly picks up where openings are present within the opposition block. Aware of his surroundings through his scanning, Nelson’s particularly dangerous drifting infield to exploit space between the opposition’s midfield and defensive lines.

In doing so, this causes defenders confusion over who should mark him, for his marker (typically the opposing fullback) isn’t always keen to move inside and leave the flank unoccupied, while the opposition central defenders are hesitant to step out and jeopardise their structure. This inherently means Nelson is free to receive in these ideal central zones, where he can then weave his magic with the ball at his feet to drive his team forward.

Another valuable way he finds space is by rotating with his colleagues. On many instances Nelson’s interchanging with his nearby fullback, far side winger, attacking midfielder or centre forward, has freed him or a colleague up, with this placing extra doubt in defenders’ minds.

Competent at pinning and drawing markers away from usable space for his fellow attackers, he’s importantly managed to impact when the ball isn’t in his immediate area. This has been most notable when he’s pinned his fullback wide to generate gaps for a midfielder or striker to receive infield and when drawing his trackers central to generate room for Arsenal’s fullbacks to push into.

The exciting youngster’s runs in behind and into the box also warrant mention, for he cleverly targets gaps in between defenders so he can gain separation while embarking on his runs. Instinctive and a sound reader of the play, he angles and directs his runs nicely to get into strong positions to score or latch onto through balls.

Very good at holding back his runs inside the box as the defence collapses deep and at targeting the blindside of markers, he’s a real handful for defenders.

His blistering runs have also been a weapon during counter attacks, where he relishes springing forward at every available opportunity to be an outlet.

When not pushing infield, Nelson’s demonstrated his worth when hugging the touchline, so he can receive switches of play and isolate himself 1v1 with his man, before cutting infield and powering towards the final third. So good at adding width and depth to attacks, plus at connecting play when coming inside, his multifaceted movement is a wonderful component of his game.

He accompanies this with his technical qualities: his creative dribbling and passing are handy assets. A fantastic dribbler, who boasts a clean first touch and sharp ball control, his aptitude in this regard serves him well in many situations. Capable of beating his man in a variety of ways, he uses stepovers, feints, shimmies, nutmegs and wicked changes of pace and direction to outfox opponents.

Remaining composed on the ball when under duress, he handles being pressed efficiently, as the balanced, fleet footed attacker can weave out of trouble with his maneuverability in close quarters. Another byproduct of his ball carrying prowess is how it provokes one or more trackers, which can vitally create a free man further upfield, plus how it sees him win fouls in advanced locations.

His comfort with the ball at his feet is useful when he drops deep with his back to goal, thus meaning he can either turn his man or hold onto the ball while he waits for an option. His proficient scanning notably holds him good stead when receiving so he knows whether to position his body to protect the ball or to turn and go.

Full of flair and ingenuity, Nelson can be an extremely elusive proposition to contain when on top of his game, with his dribbling giving him essential time and space to execute his actions. While he can overdo it on occasion and rashly turn the ball over, the positives far outweigh any negatives. All that’s needed is a little work on his decision making.

Meanwhile, in terms of his passing, he can link play cleanly with his intricate one and two touch combination play, recycle possession, slide in tidy through balls, switch the angle of attacks and hit some encouraging deliveries into the box.

His capacity to use crafty one-twos has been a real highlight, which has enabled him to get the return ball past his man in a forward facing posture to continue attacks. This may seem simple, but against tough to break down blocks, this can be an efficient method to manufacture openings to unlock and destabilise opposition backlines.

Weighting his passes neatly and with accuracy, the majority of his distribution has been precise. Although this is an area of his game that he’s continuing to develop, his ability to spot his teammates’ runs and use both feet has been valuable, even if his execution can let him down on occasion. If he can consistently get this area of his game fully firing, his threat and opportunities will surely increase.

Looking at his numbers from Arsenal’s friendlies and the Newcastle win, there’s a lot to like about his output. Indeed, his averages of 0.47 XG per 90, 4.41 successful dribbles p90 at 65.4%, 2.33 shots p90, 4.67 touches inside the box p90, 3.63 progressive runs p90, 0.7 key passes p90 and 1.3 fouls suffered p90 illustrate this aptly.

At still just 19 and with so much scope for improvement, working under the guidance of Emery should help him take his game to the next level. With the Spanish coach’s desire to give the likes of Joe Willock, Matteo Guendouzi and himself vital game time, this could be a breakthrough season for him. While he’ll predominantly have to settle for minutes off the bench and starts in the cups, his skill set suits either option. But he could be especially handy coming on against tiring defences if the Gunners need a lift.

Patient, yet keen to develop and to hone his craft in the highly competitive confines at Arsenal, tracking Nelson’s progress this season will be intriguing on his road to fulfilling his dream of making it at his beloved boyhood club.

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golazohaze
golazohaze

yep

And_Unai_Said...
And_Unai_Said...

Admiral Nelson to lead the attack one day.

And_Unai_Said...
And_Unai_Said...

Never been first to post before. Had to get in first with whatever…

Joey Jojo Jr Shabadoo
Joey Jojo Jr Shabadoo

You didn’t. And I mean that in two ways.

James
James

Why do people care about posting first?
Bizarre.

Dave
Dave

Don’t say that too loudly. The lads from the old fashioned arseblog.com ‘arses’ will get upset.

midgunner
midgunner

Awesome detailed analysis!

Do you think he will get enough game time to develop with us or would you have sent him on loan? I’m assuming he’ll get time in the Europa League games and the cups.

I would have been tempted to loan out Reis and keep Eddie, but I can understand it’s a subtle difference.

There’s certainly room in the team for someone with his dribbling ability and runs off the ball.

PeteyB
PeteyB

Nelson did his time on loan last year, I think giving Eddie the time out was the right decision. Maybe if opportunities dry up in the later stages of Europa league etc. he could go out again in January, but as the article says as an option from the bench he’s a good guy to have about. Equally if, Bergkamp forbid, Auba picks up an injury he’d be the most natural replacement, and certainly one I’d be inclined to give time to ahead of Mkhi right now.

Chickenshite

He’s our very own and that’s something to behold! I hope he can bring back the culture of integrating young players into the team once again like we used to. Most recent ones to come through and really establish themselves this way were Wilshere & Ramsey. Reiss is more attack minded than them so in my opinion can become more important and have a higher ceiling than them. That’s just my opinion

Bendtnerschristmastree
Bendtnerschristmastree

should defo be higher than mkhi in the pecking order

Pepe Le Pew
Pepe Le Pew

Great talent. Love his close control. With a bit of confidence he’ll run at defenders and create Nelson mayhem.

Tim
Tim

Really good piece, Edward. Great to have another insightful contributor to Arseblog! Keen to read your articles in the future.

Ourchildrensworld

Love the analysis.

Those details that link the middle and final third are exactly what we need, and part of what we weren’t getting from Iwobi.

The thing that’s great about Nelson is his intelligence. I’m looking forward to him being more of a ‘protagonist’ in the final third. I’m sure that will come with more game time.

Definitely the player I’m most excited about, simply because we’ve been crying out for someone like him from our youth teams for quite a while.

Runzac
Runzac

Fantastic analysis. Really like this young man Nelson. Hope he gets all the minutes he deserves.

Tapps

I just hope and pray he doesn’t read all they hype and get carried away. He clearly is a special talent – but talent alone is valueless. It needs to be combined with effort, humility, hard work and a desire to be the best. Titi didn’t become the best player in the world entirely because of his natural ability.

Savage
Savage

“It was a great gesture from the boss”

Love this. It shows character to appreciate what you have and not act like the world owes you something.

Santori
Santori

Its the maturity in Nelson’s play I think that convinces the boss that we can risk on Iwobi (although I still have misgivings)

He seems to have developed in leaps and bounds since his loan move.

Which is why I think we need to manage our development of players better picking the right time to let them out on strong loans (mavro) and when to give them limited education closer to first team.

The latter favours some of the younger players bc they won’t get as many regular playing time although you could easily of course also be sidelined away on loan as was the case of Smith-Rowe.

Hope to see Emile start to feature with first team this season.

Billy Bob
Billy Bob

Reckon we could have a 4-2-3-1 formation I think Auba should be up to with the three behind being ozil or Nelson on the left, Laca centre and Pepe on the right

GoonerNJ
GoonerNJ

Fantastic analysis, Edward! Looking forward to more of these as the season goes on!