Guendouzi: We shouldn’t play until the epidemic stops

13

Aside from the club’s interview with Mikel Arteta, we’ve not heard much from the Arsenal camp since the players and staff went into self-isolation back in March.

Initially, they were holding daily meetings, undertaking solo training programmes and generally keeping themselves in good nick in case they were called upon. With football still not on the horizon, we imagine they’ve been allowed to relax a bit.

Via social media we’ve learned that Mesut has become a dad, Hector and Ainsley have cut off their hair, Lacazette has become really good at posing with his Ferrari, Sokratis still can’t smile and Aubameyang owns loads of random footballs. It’s been a thrilling ride.

But what of Matteo Guendouzi? For some reason, we imagined that of all the players, he’s the one who might be finding it harder than any to stay indoors and social distance. All that hair, all that energy, all that eagerness to mug off other people…surely he must be finding it tough?

In an interview with TF1 journalist Julien Maynard (translated by Sport Witness) it sounds as though he’s coping fine. And interestingly, he has some very mature views on what should and shouldn’t be happening.

While the Fifa, Uefa and governing bodies across the world desperately try to figure out how to get players back on the pitch, Matteo believes that football should be a distant second to the health of everyone around the globe. He’s not interested in kicking a ball in anger anytime soon.

“For me, what I think is most important is to not start things up again, no games, no training, until this epidemic stops. What’s most important is everybody’s health, and not just in the football world, but in the medical world and the world in general. That’s really what’s most important.

“I’m in favour of nothing starting up again until this virus is taken off this world.”

He added: “For now, the orders have been clear. There’s nothing at all. No training, no games, and not for a while. We know the United Kingdom took measures a bit after France, which means this period is starting to be very difficult here.

“There’s a lot of people who are starting to die from this virus. I don’t know if we’re at the start or just in the middle, but we know it’s not the end of this virus, so we know it’s not going to start back up just yet.”

It’s hard to argue with his standpoint. That said, with players in Germany returning to training this week, albeit under strict conditions, we suspect the Premier League will be champing at the bit to do similar.

guest
13 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Pakgooner
Pakgooner
1 month ago

It’s prevalent in Germany as well but I think earlier testing resulted in fewer deaths, creating an anomaly in the trend EU is following. Shops like Rewe, Lidl & Aldi are open in Germany too with limited hrs. UK’s been hit far worse so I don’t expect football to start until the peak has been crossed. Stay safe wherever you are mates

Eric Blair
Eric Blair
1 month ago
Reply to  Pakgooner

Germany took it more seriously early on and deployed contact tracing and testing to contain it as much as possible. This means the lock down is less severe in Germany and people will get back to some semblance of normality sooner. What ‘normality’ means post Covid is another question. I was wondering how footballers were taking all of this so it’s interesting to hear from Guendouzi. They’re not all mercenaries and some will feel desperate about losing so much of what is a short career. I suppose it’s easier for Guendouzi when he has so many of his best years… Read more »

MRtin
MRtin
1 month ago
Reply to  Pakgooner

Lidl and Aldi are also open in this country too

Fatgooner
Fatgooner
1 month ago

Guendouzi is wrong. It’s probably going to take two years before this terrible virus is completely eradicated, so things are going to have to be properly and carefully managed in the meantime. What do we do over the coming months is a very interesting question. For me, the cup competitions should all be scrapped. There just isn’t enough time to play them. But the major leagues around Europe should all be completed, even if the games take place behind closed doors. With financially crucial decisions concerning promotion and relegation, and CL qualification at stake, it would be grossly unfair to… Read more »

Atom
Atom
1 month ago
Reply to  Fatgooner

the hit clubs would take from not receiving tv revenue for finishing the league almost guarantees the pl will finish the season – likely behind closed doors. It’s hard to imagine governments allowing large crowds before fall.

Dave
Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Fatgooner

If one footballer, member of staff or fan dies due to it being brought back too early it’s not worth it.

C.B.
C.B.
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

Even Mourinho?

OK, given his lack of success at Sp*rs, even he is worth saving.

healthcareprofessional
healthcareprofessional
1 month ago
Reply to  Fatgooner

as a self-declared fat lad your risk with corona will be heightened with the comorbidities brought on from necking pies in the clock end. be more thoughtful with your words

Naked Cygan
Naked Cygan
1 month ago

We shouldn’t play till we sort out the defensive problems

Rohan
Rohan
1 month ago

It’s incredibly easy to argue with his position because it’s a nonsensical opinion.

SciGunner
SciGunner
1 month ago
Reply to  Rohan

I guess you are the same Rohan who were arguing a few weeks ago that COVID is nothing to worry about and the world is overreacting?

Badaab
Badaab
1 month ago

Its the correct call. Write the season off, or finish it with an asterisk and give Liverpool the title. It ultimately doesn’t matter at this point.

Ourchildrensworld
1 month ago

He’s right, but money talks.

There’s no bailout for football so the authorities will be keen to return to business as usual, ASAP.

The sport is entertainment. If it takes 2 years to eliminate the danger, I’m fine with waiting.

We pretend we’d die for our clubs, but I don’t think we should flirt with that reality. Let’s stay safe.